Anita

Anita Grigoriadis

Jelmar

Jelmar Quist

tom

Tom Hardiman

orsi

Orsolya Sipos

Yue

Yue Chen

Radhika

Radhika Kataria

Ayesha

Ayesha Iqbal

Lawson

Lawson Taylor

Max Grogan

 


Dr Anita Grigoriadis

Lecturer in Cancer Bioinformatics

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anita

Anita Grigoriadis is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Cancer and Pharmaceutical Sciences at King’s College London (KCL), the School Lead (International) and Training Lead for the CRUK KHP Centre, and holds a guest lecturership at Birkbeck College, University of London. Anita is the lead of “CAncer microBiome ImmuNology DAtascience” (CABINDA), a newly formed initiative between the School of Cancer and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dental Institute and Faculty of Natural & Mathematical Sciences.

After her Master’s degree at the Institute of Molecular Pathology, University of Vienna (Austria), she pursued a joint PhD between the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research (LICR), London, and Faculty of Natural Sciences, Salzburg (Austria). Anita conducted her postdoctoral training on breast cancer genomics at the LICR, and later moved to the Breakthrough Breast Cancer Centre (London) with Professor Alan Ashworth. In 2008, she joined the Breast Cancer NOW Unit (formerly Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research) at KCL under the leadership of Professor Andrew Tutt, where her bioinformatics interest in studying genomic instability and immune-related features in breast cancer started.


Jelmar Quist

Postdoctoral Cancer Bioinformatician

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Jelmar

Jelmar Quist received his undergraduate degree in Bioinformatics from the University of Applied Sciences Leiden, The Netherlands, followed by a one-year Master of Research in Bioinformatics with Systems Biology at Birkbeck, University of London. In 2013 he obtained a PhD studentship in Translational Medicine from the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Guy’s and St Thomas’. He completed his PhD in Cancer Bioinformatics in March 2018, focusing on the identification of drivers and dependencies of genomic instability in TNBC. In his current work, funded by Breast Cancer Now, he is trying to understand how the ectopic expression of HORMAD1 (Watkins et al. Cancer Discov. 2015) impinges on DNA damage response and influences the tumour immune microenvironment. By building on this knowledge, he aims to optimise patient stratification and improve treatment strategies for a hard-to-treat patient population.

 


Tom Hardiman

PhD Student

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Tom

Tom is currently in his second year of an MRC funded PhD within the Cancer Bioinformatics group, which he started in October 2017. His project focuses on understanding the transcriptional changes that occur in the lymph node during the development of breast cancer metastasis. Tom completed his undergraduate degree in Biochemistry from King’s College London, followed by a masters in Bioinformatics and Theoretical Systems Biology form Imperial College London.

 


Orsolya Sipos

Postdoctoral Cancer Bioinformatician

orsi

Orsolya completed her doctoral studies in the Cell Biophysics research group at the Biological Research Centre of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. After receiving her PhD she worked for the Anthony Nolan Trust, a charity supporting stem cell transplant research, then she joined the Clinical Trials and Statistics Unit of The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR). In September 2017 Orsolya moved to the Bioinformatics Team in the Breast Cancer Now Centre at ICR in collaboration with our group. She is currently working on the data analysis of the Triple Negative breast cancer Trial (TNT) focusing on potential molecular biomarkers. Her main research interests are analysis of integrated multi-omics datasets and applications of machine learning technology in clinical trials.

 


Yue Chen

PhD Student

yue

Yue Chen received his undergraduate in Biomedical Sciences at the University College London. After completing a MRes in translational Oncology at the University of Sheffield, he worked in Next-Generation-Sequencing based clinical diagnostic company in Guangzhou China. Yue is now a first year PhD student in the Cancer Bioinformatics team. His research focuses on the immunogenicity of HORMAD1 (a Cancer/Testis antigen) expressing tumours by integrating the correlation between genomic instability, neoantigen burden and tumour immune cell infiltration.


Radhika Kataria

PhD Student

Radhika

Radhika has recently started her MRC funded PhD in cancer bioinformatics after completing an integrated masters at the University of York. Her project will be focused on trying to identify biomarkers in cell free tumor DNA (cfDNA) to allow early detection of cancers. CfDNA can be obtained from liquid biopsies and is a non-invasive method of retrieving tumor-derived substances from patients. She will spend the next year familliarising herself with key bioinformatic techniques required to analyse diverse molecular datasets including gene expression, mutational patterns and structural genomic alterations. Ultimately, she would like to exploit this data to implement deep learning techniques and compare this to Bayesian statistical methods and explore the pros and cons of these analytical avenues.


Ayesha Iqbal

Bioinformatician
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Ayesha

Ayesha completed her master’s in Data Science from King’s College London. Having a keen interest in the biological applications of her course she did her master’s dissertation on investigating the presence and effects of modified gamma delta T cells in Breast Cancer. She is currently working as bioinformatician in the group focusing on Pathogenic Germline Variations in breast cancers with a specific interest in DDR gene alterations and their consequences.


Lawson Taylor

Bioinformatician

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lawson

Lawson completed his first degree in Mathematics from the University of Leeds in 2013. From there he went into Financial Services. In the fall of 2016 he undertook a Data Science MSc at King’s College London, in which he wrote his thesis on Novels Drivers of Osteosarcoma. On completing his masters in the autumn of 2017 he has joined the Bioinformatics team on a full time basis, working predominantly on the immune landscape of Triple Negative Breast Cancer. His work revolves around utilising different aspects of Mathematics and Machine Learning to derive meaningful insights from genomic data that can provide avenues for future medical treatments for Breast Cancer patients.


Max Grogan

Research Student

Max is a Biochemistry Undergraduate from King’s College London, he undertook a summer studentship at the Breast Cancer Research Unit and has continued to work with the group . He received the prestigious BBSRC studentship of which only one per year is allocated to KCL. He is investigating the transcriptional regulation mechanisms of the genomic instability driver HORMAD1, by interrogating methylation, WGS, ENCODE, and gene expression data.